Matt. 6 | Believe Me You Have Nothing To Worry About

Matt. 6 | Believe Me You Have Nothing To Worry About

“Therefore do not be anxious about tomorrow,
for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Sufficient
for the day is its own trouble.”

Mt. 6.34

In Matthew 6.25-34, Jesus teaches us that it never pays to worry. Instead, we must learn to trust God to meet our every need. It’s true that we all have things in life that can distress us and cause us to be anxious so that we often dwell on our difficulties and troubles.

Jesus’ word on worry comes just after his instruction about money and possessions. Our tendency is to place our trust in money above our trust in God, who is our Provider. Many people think money is the solution to everything, and if we only had enough of it, we could buy our way out of most of our troubles. But we must remember the One who is our source and Provider. Interestingly, the phrase, “In God We Trust” was coined (ha, ha),  back in1864 to help our nation to remember. In 1957, it was declared our national motto and was placed prominently on all U.S. currency. Would that our nation believed it. As Christians, surely we can affirm it the best and choose to live above our circumstances. This doesn’t come naturally. God will normally take us through difficult times and situations in which we must learn to trust him. Only in this way, can we discover who he really is and come to trust him more deeply.

To convince us that we CAN trust him, Jesus suggests that we reflect on a couple of everyday examples to see that God takes care of some seemingly insignificant parts of his creation – the birds and the flowers. If God cares about even these short-lived members of his creation, making sure they are fed and clothed, surely we must believe that he will take care of us, who are made for eternity! Jesus actually goes further, telling us that God will take care of us far better than these (“…will he not much more…” v.30b).

The root of worry, according to Jesus, is simply a failure to trust God. When we worry, we have a faith problem, not a resource problem. You might say, “That’s easy if you’re not going through the problem I’m going through.” Yet, Jesus is insistent, “Do not be anxious about your life” (vv.25, 31). How, then, do you keep from worrying? How do you stop being anxious? Jesus’ answer is to stop thinking about what you don’t have and remember who you do have. The “what I don’t have” mentality is typical for those that don’t know God. The pagans are consumed with solving their own problem(s). Jesus followers must trust God.

How? The Lord tells us to make seeking and pursuing God’s kingdom and his righteousness the number one priority in life. Focus on that. Meet that condition, he says, and God promises … He promises … that “all these things” (i.e., all your needs) will be given to you. Jesus wants us to learn that our greatest treasure (v.21) must be in God.

To wrap-up his teaching on worry, Jesus relates an important “anti-worry principle” found in verse 34, essentially telling us to live “one-day-at-a-time”. Live in the present, not in the future. Don’t borrow on tomorrow’s trouble. Much of what we worry about for tomorrow never happens today. What could happen tomorrow we typically cannot control today. But we have a God who controls our all our days and can make today’s bad thing turn into something good.

So, whatever it is, let him worry about it. Let HIM worry about it.

There’s the story about the man who constantly worried about everything. Then one day, his friends heard him whistling happily and looking noticeably relaxed. Surprised by his now peaceful demeanor, they asked him, “What happened to you? You don’t seem so uptight.”

He said, “Well, I’m paying a man to do my worrying for me.”

“How much do you pay him?” they asked.

“Two thousand dollars a week,” he replied.

“Wow! How can you afford that?”

“I can’t,” he said, “but that’s his worry.”

The Bible reminds us, “Cast your cares on the Lord and he will sustain you” (Psalm 55:22).

It never pays to worry. Do you believe that?

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